May is Jewish American Heritage Month

We have so much to celebrate in May!

As well as AAPI Heritage Month, May is also Jewish American Heritage month.

Since Jewish Americans have been apart of the United States since the 1600s, it was only right1 that in the year 2006, former president George W. Bush labeled the month of May, Jewish American Heritage Month.

To get a taste of2 Jewish American culture in New York City, one highly recommended movie is called

The Chosen.

The movie is set in the 1940s. It is about two Jewish kids in Brooklyn who become friends. One boy is from a very conservative family, and the other boy is from a more liberal family. The issues of importance of tradition, parental expectations, and the formation of Israel cause many problems in their lives.

References :https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082175/

Click the website below to find more movies about Jewish American culture!

it was only right1 = it was the right thing to do/ it made sense

To get a taste of2 = to experience a little bit

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International Women’s Day

Hi all! Today is International Women’s Day, which has been celebrated every year on March 8th since 1977.

Around the world, women have always lacked rights and/or equal treatment. Even today, women are paid less than men, on average. In addition, women in almost every country lack full freedom to choose what they do with their own bodies when it comes to the issue of abortion.

Women’s Day invites us to recognize that this is wrong, and work towards reaching the day when full equality can be achieved.

Watch the video below to learn more about this day and women’s history:

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BLACK HISTORY MONTH

Happy Monday, all! This month (and every February) is Black History Month in the United States. During the whole month, we remember and honor the contributions of all the past and present figures who have impacted American history in different ways. It also reminds us of the ongoing movement to spread tolerance and equality while eliminating racism and discrimination.

Watch the video below to learn more.

QUIZ!

[qsm quiz=10]

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Fourth of July – Independence Day

The Fourth of July—also known as Independence Day or July 4th—has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1941, but the tradition of Independence Day celebrations goes back to the 18th century and the American Revolution. On July 2nd, 1776, the Continental Congress voted in favor of independence, and two days later delegates from the 13 colonies adopted the Declaration of Independence, a historic document drafted by Thomas Jefferson. From 1776 to the present day, July 4th has been celebrated as the birth of American independence, with festivities ranging from fireworks, parades and concerts to more casual family gatherings and barbecues. The Fourth of July 2021 is on Sunday, July 4, 2021; the federal holiday will be observed on Monday, July 5, 2021.

from history.com

Click Here to Read More!

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Happy Juneteenth!

Juneteenth is this Saturday, June 19! To learn more about this holiday, view the video above. And as of the writing of this post Congress is on it’s way to making it an official federal holiday. Read more below…

From CNN.com

The Senate unanimously passed a resolution on Tuesday establishing June 19 as Juneteenth National Independence Day, a US holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States.The legislation has gained momentum since the massive Black Lives Matter protests sparked by the police killing of George Floyd last year and the Democrats’ takeover of the White House and Congress.

The measure needs to pass the House and be signed by President Joe Biden to become law. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer tweeted that the chamber would vote Wednesday.

To read more, click here!

Click here to read about Juneteenth in Chinese (中文).

Click here to read about Juneteenth in Spanish (español).

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NYC Human Rights

What are human rights?

Human rights are rights we have simply because we exist as human beings – they are not granted by any state. These universal rights are inherent to us all, regardless of nationality, sex, national or ethnic origin, color, religion, language, or any other status. They range from the most fundamental – the right to life – to those that make life worth living, such as the rights to food, education, work, health, and liberty. – from United Nations Human Rights Office of the High Commissioner

Are your human rights protected in NYC? If not…

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