Juneteenth

Juneteenth, always African-American, now American!

Juneteenth is a newly recognized American holiday, but has always been recognized by African-Americans. It celebrates African-Americans finally being freed from slavery.

Although, July 4th is officially America’s independence day, Juneteenth has been independence day for African-Americans for centuries.

The history is not complicated. In the year 1619, Africans were brought to The United States as slaves. Many different tribes, ethnic groups, and people were stolen from Africa and brought to America. It was a sad and horrible time for Black people in the Americas.

“In the year 1863, during the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln issued1 the Emancipation Proclamation, which declared more than three million slaves living in the Confederate states to be free. More than two years passed before the news reached African Americans living in Texas. It was not until Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, that the people finally learned that slavery had been abolished. The newly freed slaves immediately began to celebrate with prayer, a feast, song, and dance.”

On June 15th 2021, Juneteenth finally became a national holiday, not only for African-Americans, but for all Americans, to celebrate the freedom of every American.

issued1– To give or deal out; distribute.

References: Juneteenth | History, Meaning, Flag, Importance, & Facts | Britannica

Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopedia. “Juneteenth”. Encyclopedia Britannica, 19 Apr. 2022, https://www.britannica.com/topic/Juneteenth. Accessed 14 June 2022.

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¡Que Bonita Bandera!

What a beautiful flag!

Source: nbcnews.com

June is exciting in New York City for many reasons, the weather is finally hot, beaches are open, and my personal favorite – THE PARADES!

A parade is a large number of people walking or in vehicles, all going in the same direction, usually as part of a public celebration of something.

After 2 years of pausing for COVID, the annual1. Puerto Rican Day Parade is back! This parade celebrates the approximately 890,000 Puerto Ricans in New York. Puerto Ricans make up about 4.4% of the population of New York City.

The Parade takes place on the 2nd Sunday of June – making it fall on Sunday, June 12th 2022 this year!

The parade marches along Fifth Avenue from 44th Street to 86th Street and has grown to become one of the largest parades in the United States.

Whether or not you are Puerto Rican, you should come and celebrate a unique piece of New York’s culture at the 65th annual Puerto Rican Day Parade!

  1. Annual-Once a year

References:

https://lcw.lehman.edu/lehman/depts/latinampuertorican/latinoweb/PuertoRico/prpopcit.htm#:~:text=New%20York%20has%20approximately%20890%2C000,increase%20significantly%20during%20the%201980s.

https://www.nprdpinc.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puerto_Rican_Day_Parade#:~:text=The%20first%20Puerto%20Rican%20Day,the%20former%20Hispanic%20Day%20Parade.

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Teacher Orientation!

Before student orientation that will kick off this weekend, we just finished our 3 day teacher orientation, 2 days online and 1 day in person. We don’t have any new teachers this year because everybody is returning either from last year or many years ago! Welcome back, everyone! We talked about our teaching materials, lesson planning, classroom management especially for this COVID-era, and a bunch of other things. Good luck and health with a new school year!

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What happened on January 6, 2021?

We have already been undergoing a historic pandemic with the highest numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths in the world. On January 6, 2021, to rub salt into the wound, we had to witness another historic event that our democracy was being threatened at the Capitol. Here is the timeline of the U.S. Capitol attack. Let’s remember what happened because we need to learn from history.

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Online Reading Club for English Learners!

Heidi

From the New York Public Library:

Are you beginning to read stories in English? Do you need more practice?

Come join other ESOL students this fall to practice your reading online! We will take turns reading aloud together from two or three books.

You must register with your email address in order to receive the link to participate. The link will be sent to you by email approximately one day before the discussion. You will need a device with audio and/or video and an internet connection to join.

  • Friday, October 16, 2020, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Friday, October 30, 2020, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

End times are approximate. Events may end early or late.

Click here to register!

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