Grammar Lesson: Phrasal Verbs

What are they?

Phrasal verbs are verbs that contain multiple words.

Like regular verbs, there are thousands, but you can find an extensive list below.

https://www.gingersoftware.com/content/grammar-rules/verbs/list-of-phrasal-verbs/

Now that you’ve seen plenty of examples, it’s time to learn how they can and can’t be used. The video below is very helpful.

Ready to test what you have learned? Try our quiz below.

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Idiom of the Week: Hang in there

It’s been a while since we have had an idiom of the week. Here is a common used phrase.

Meaning: to just wait a little longer while in a difficult situation because relief is coming soon.

Example 1: Hang in there! I’m almost there to help.

Example 2: I had one week left of school while working full time and my mom told me to, “Hang in there.”

Example 3: If you can be strong and hang in there just a little longer, things will get easier.


In which situation/s would someone most likely tell you to, "Hang in there?" (more than one answer is possible)

QUIZ

In which situation/s would someone most likely tell you to, “Hang in there?” (more than one answer is possible)

a. You’re having fun at a party.

b. You’re on a long car ride and can’t stop, but you have to use the bathroom.

c. Your soccer team is winning, but the other team is quickly catching up with only 2 minutes left to play.

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Idiom of the Week: “A Blessing in Disguise”

Meaning: A blessing in disguise is something that seems to be bad but actually there is a positive result.

Examples:

I wasn’t accepted to my first choice school, but it was a blessing in disguise because another school accepted me and that’s where I met my wife.

Having a baby in high school was a blessing in disguise since it turned his life in a positive direction by making him realize he had to grow up himself.

Sometimes we don’t see a blessing in disguise right away – it could be years before we see the blessing.

Pop Quiz:

Which of these sounds like a blessing in disguise?

a. I had no money, then won the lottery.

b. When I tripped and fell on the street, I hurt myself but found $100.

c. I failed my test, but my mom still bought me ice cream.

Read More to see the answer.

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Idiom of the Week: “Cutting Corners”

Meaning:

Cutting corners is to take the fastest way to finish something in order to do less work, however the result is also lesser.

Examples:

Copying other students’ homework is just cutting corners – you may fool the teacher but you won’t learn.

The big assignment was due Thursday morning and Wednesday he hadn’t started, so he cut corners to finish.

Cutting corners will only get you so far – eventually you will be passed over by those who work harder.

Pop Quiz:

True or False? When you cut corners, you…

1. Work as hard as you can

2. Leave out details

3. Finish quickly

4. Do the best job possible

5. Will always succeed

Read More to see the answers.

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Teacher Orientation!

Before student orientation that will kick off this weekend, we just finished our 3 day teacher orientation, 2 days online and 1 day in person. We don’t have any new teachers this year because everybody is returning either from last year or many years ago! Welcome back, everyone! We talked about our teaching materials, lesson planning, classroom management especially for this COVID-era, and a bunch of other things. Good luck and health with a new school year!

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