Irregular Past Tense Verbs

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Regular past tense verbs are easy to remember – you usually just add an “ed.” But with irregular past tense verbs you need to change the spelling even more. Here’s a list of some very common ones that you might find useful:

BASE FORM        PAST TENSE

be                           was/were

begin                     began

break                    broke

bring                      brought

build                      built

buy                        bought

choose                 chose

come                     came

do                           did

drink                      drank

drive                      drove

eat                         ate

fall                          fell

feel                        felt

forget                   forgot

get                         got

give                        gave

go                           went

have                      had

hear                       heard

keep                      kept

know                     knew

leave                     left

lose                        lost

make                     made

meet                     met

pay                         paid

put                         put

read                       read (pronounced “red”)

ride                        rode

run                         ran

say                         said

see                         saw

sell                         sold

send                      sent

sit                           sit

sleep                     slept

speak                    spoke

spend                   spent

stand                     stood

take                       took

teach                     taught

tell                          told

think                      thought

understand        understood

wear                      wore

write                     wrote

Idiom of the Week: Start Off on the Right Foot

The first Idiom of the Week of 2020!

Meaning: To begin something in a good way; to start well. Also used with “get off” or “get started.”

Examples:

Let’s get 2020 started on the right foot with a wonderful new Idiom of the Week!

I prefer to start our meeting off on the right foot and talk about the good things before we move on to the bad things.

I didn’t start this day off on the right foot today – I burned my breakfast and spilled coffee all over the floor.

 

Pop Quiz:

What’s a good example of starting off on the right foot?

A.  Having an argument with your new spouse on your wedding day.

B.  Failing your first test your first year in college.

C.  Saying something offensive on your first date.

To see the correct answer, click on “Read More.”

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