Study English with Duolingo

duolingo

Out of fairness to our students – who come from many different countries – we don’t give bilingual classes. But there’s a website you can use at home using your first language to study English (and English speakers can use it to study other languages, too.) It’s called Duolingo. So far, Duolingo supports these languages:

duolingo2

Click here or on either of the pictures above to start studying.

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Studying for the Citizenship Test

Many of our students are trying to become U.S. citizens. An excellent site you can use to study for the U.S. Citizenship Test (also known as the Naturalization Test) comes from U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services. They have everything you need to pass the test: flashcards, interactive lessons, booklets, and all kinds of other study materials.

 Click here or on the picture below to go to the site:

citizen1

 

 

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Website Spotlight: What’s Going On In This Picture?

What’s going on in this picture? Look closely at the image above or view it in a larger size, then tell us what you see by posting a comment. On Tuesday, we will reveal more about the image and its origins at the bottom of this post.

From the New York Times Learning Network:

1. After looking closely at the image above (or at the full-size image), think about these three questions:

  • What’s going on in this picture?
  • What do you see that makes you say that?
  • What more can you find?

2. Next, join the conversation by posting a comment. (Please remember not to post your last name.)

3. After you have posted, try reading back to see what others have said, then respond to someone else by posting another comment. Use the “@” symbol to address that student directly.

Each Monday, NYT’s collaborators, Visual Thinking Strategies, will facilitate a discussion from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Eastern time by paraphrasing comments and linking to responses to help students’ understanding go deeper. You might use their responses as models for your own.

4. On Tuesday, the NYT will reveal more information at the bottom of this post about the photo. How does reading the caption and learning its “back story” help you to see the image differently?

To go to the “What’s Going on in This Picture?” page, click here.

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