Irregular Past Tense Verbs

Vintage Alarm Clock

Regular past tense verbs are easy to remember – you usually just add an “ed.” But with irregular past tense verbs you need to change the spelling even more. Here’s a list of some very common ones that you might find useful:

BASE FORM        PAST TENSE

be                           was/were

begin                     began

break                    broke

bring                      brought

build                      built

buy                        bought

choose                 chose

come                     came

do                           did

drink                      drank

drive                      drove

eat                         ate

fall                          fell

feel                        felt

forget                   forgot

get                         got

give                        gave

go                           went

have                      had

hear                       heard

keep                      kept

know                     knew

leave                     left

lose                        lost

make                     made

meet                     met

pay                         paid

put                         put

read                       read (pronounced “red”)

ride                        rode

run                         ran

say                         said

see                         saw

sell                         sold

send                      sent

sit                           sit

sleep                     slept

speak                    spoke

spend                   spent

stand                     stood

take                       took

teach                     taught

tell                          told

think                      thought

understand        understood

wear                      wore

write                     wrote

Share this:

Countable vs. Non-Countable Nouns

Image result for count noncount

Count (also known as countable) nouns can be counted, which means you can also make them plural. Remember that plural means more than one. For example, the word “teacher.” Can you count teachers? Of course – one teacher, two teachers, three teachers, four teachers. The noun “teacher,” then, is a count noun.

Non-count (or non-countable) nouns can’t be counted, and they’re almost always singular. Remember that singular means one. For example, the word “air.” Can you count air? Of course not – we never say one air, two airs, three airs, etc. So “air” is a non-count noun.

To learn more, watch the following video, then take the quiz to test your knowledge:

Share this:

Much, Many, A Lot Of – Which One Do I Use?

By Flunse (Patrick Geltinger) – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=404343

Time for more grammar. This time we’re going to look at the words much, many, and a lot of.

The key to knowing when to use these words is remembering your count and non-count nouns. To review count and noun-count nouns, click here.

Basically, you use “many” with plural count nouns. For example: many people, many apples, many problems, many friends. You can use “many” in statements and questions, affirmative or negative.

“Much,” on the other hand, is used with non-count nouns. For example: much money, much homework, much coffee, much trouble. But we only use “much” in questions and negative statements. For example: “I don’t have much money. How much money do you have?” We do not say “I have much money.”

In this case, we say “I have a lot of money.” “A lot of” can be used with count or non-count nouns – it doesn’t matter! It can also be used in questions and statements, negative or affirmative. But if we begin the question with “how,” then we have to use either “much” or “many.” We can’t say “How a lot of money do you have?’

Watch this video for some extra practice, then take the quiz to test your knowledge:

 

Share this:

Articles 101

One difficult part of English is articles – but we use them a lot, so it’s important to know them. There are three articles in the English language: “a,” “an,” and “the.”

“A” and “an” are called indefinite articles because they are used when we talk about something in general, or when we talk about something for the first time. We use “an” when the next word begins with a vowel (a, e, i, o, u) and we use “a” with words that begin with a consonant (all the other letters in the alphabet). In addition, we only use “a” and “an” with singular count nouns:

There was an earthquake in Japan two years ago.         

How much does a new car cost?         

Is there a bathroom in this building?

“The,” on the other hand, is a definite article.We use it when we’re talking about something specific, or when we continue to talk about something we’ve introduced. “The” can be used for singular or plural nouns, count or non-count:

The people in my class are very friendly.       

The refrigerator is broken!          

I took the F Train this morning.

Read the following story, and pay special attention to the articles:

Last night I found a cockroach in my kitchen. The cockroach was very big and very fast. I picked up a newspaper to kill it, but the newspaper was too soft. Then I picked up a frying pan. I was able to kill the cockroach, but then I had to wash the frying pan. I washed the frying pan in the sink, but when I finished, I saw a second cockroach. The second cockroach was even bigger than the first one!

Now watch the video lesson to learn more, then you can take the quiz to test your knowledge!

Share this:

Articles, Articles, Articles

One difficult part of English is articles – but we use them a lot, so it’s important to know them. There are three articles in the English language: “a,” “an,” and “the.”

“A” and “an” are called indefinite articles because they are used when we talk about something in general, or when we talk about something for the first time. We use “an” when the next word begins with a vowel (a, e, i, o, u) and we use “a” with words that begin with a consonant (all the other letters in the alphabet). In addition, we only use “a” and “an” with singular count nouns:

There was an earthquake in Japan two years ago.         

How much does a new car cost?         

Is there a bathroom in this building?

“The,” on the other hand, is a definite article.We use it when we’re talking about something specific, or when we continue to talk about something we’ve introduced. “The” can be used for singular or plural nouns, count or non-count:

The people in my class are very friendly.       

The refrigerator is broken!          

I took the F Train this morning.

Read the following story, and pay special attention to the articles:

Last night I found a cockroach in my kitchen. The cockroach was very big and very fast. I picked up a newspaper to kill it, but the newspaper was too soft. Then I picked up a frying pan. I was able to kill the cockroach, but then I had to wash the frying pan. I washed the frying pan in the sink, but when I finished, I saw a second cockroach. The second cockroach was even bigger than the first one!

Now watch the video lesson to learn more, then you can take the quiz to test your knowledge!

Share this:

Much, Many, or A Lot Of?

Time for more grammar. This time we’re going to look at the words much, many, and a lot of.

The key to knowing when to use these words is remembering your count and non-count nouns. To review count and noun-count nouns, click here.

Basically, you use “many” with plural count nouns. For example: many people, many apples, many problems, many friends. You can use “many” in statements and questions, affirmative or negative.

“Much,” on the other hand, is used with non-count nouns. For example: much money, much homework, much coffee, much trouble. But we only use “much” in questions and negative statements. For example: “I don’t have much money. How much money do you have?” We do not say “I have much money.”

In this case, we say “I have a lot of money.” “A lot of” can be used with count or non-count nouns – it doesn’t matter! It can also be used in questions and statements, negative or affirmative. But if we begin the question with “how,” then we have to use either “much” or “many.” We can’t say “How a lot of money do you have?’

Watch this video for some extra practice, then take the quiz to test your knowledge:

Share this: