Rat Vs. Mouse

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Since 2020 is the Year of the Rat, some people have been asking about what the difference is between a rat and a mouse. Here’s some useful info for you courtesy of Diffen.com:

Mouse Versus Rat Comparison Chart

Mouse Rat
Identification Method Small feces Larger feces
Head Small, triangular, small relative to body Short, stubby, broad, large relative to body
Ears Ears are large relative to the head. Ears are small relative to the head.
Eyes Slightly bigger in relation to the head Smaller in relation to head
Muzzle Narrow with sharp muzzle Large and blunt with wide muzzle
Tail A mouse is small and has a skinny tail. A rat is bigger and has a thicker tail.
Digging burrows Mice do not dig deep and even if they do so, they may dig only to about a foot. Rats dig deep and long burrows.
Life Span 1.5 – 2.5 years 2-3 years
Genetic Differences Mice have 20 chromosome pairs & 2.6 million base pairs Rats have 21 chromosome pairs & 2.75 million base pairs
Best known species Common House Mouse (Mus Musculus) Black Rat (Rattus Rattus); Brown Rat (Rattus Norvegicus)
Romans call it Mus Minimus Mus Maximus
Spaniards call it Raton Rata

 

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U.S. Citizenship

Are you thinking of becoming a U.S. citizen? If so, you’ll eventually have to take the U.S. Naturalization Test.

The test has two parts: an English test and a Civics test. The English test consists of speaking, reading and writing. The Civics test consists of ten questions about U.S. government and history.

Here are two videos that tell you more:

For more information and study materials, visit the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ Citizenship Resource Center.

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Job Readiness Workshop

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Last Tuesday, there was a job readiness workshop held at the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association (CCBA) at 62 Mott St. It was sponsored by City Council Member Margaret Chin, and a number of neighborhood organizations sent representatives to talk about job searching, writing resumes and cover letters, filling out applications, and the dos and don’ts of job interviews.

These representatives included Joan Fang from Chinatown Manpower Project, Jeanie Tung from Henry Street Settlement, Vickie Wong from the Chinese-American Planning Council, Katya Zaitseva from CAMBA, Danielle Rothman from Streetwise Partners, Thea Goodman from Hamilton Madison House, Gaspar Caro from the LES Employment Network, and our very own Melody Lai-Nguy from University Settlement. Eva Wong from Project Hope was the moderator.

To watch a NTDTV news report on the workshop, click here or on the picture above.

To take a look at the great material presented at the workshop, click here.

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