Why The Bronx?

There are five boroughs in New York City: Manhattan (New York County), Brooklyn (Kings County), Queens (Queens County), Staten Island (Richmond County), and The Bronx (Bronx County). Have you ever wondered why The Bronx has “The” in the name while the other boroughs don’t?

Photo credit Matthew Morales, courtesy of the Bronx River Alliance

It all started in 1639 when a Scandinavian, Jonas Bronck, settled in a Dutch colonial province in New Netherland.

“When he dies in 1643 at the age of 43, the only thing that remained that was named after him through the ages was Bronck’s River,” says Bronx borough historian Lloyd Ultan.

Like with many names that can be difficult to say or write, the ‘ck’ was changed to an ‘x’—and the stream of water that ran next to Jonas Bronck’s farm became the Bronx River.

But the present day borough went without a name for more than 200 years until New York City got the land from Westchester County.

“They looked right smack in the middle of a map and there is the Bronx River, so they named it after the river, the borough of the Bronx, and that’s why it’s always called The Bronx and not just plain Bronx,” Ultan says.

The borough is named after the river. That’s named after the man that came from a foreign land in the 17th century.

from Spectrum News NY1

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Coronavirus: What Should New Yorkers Do? (Updated)

Image result for wash hands wikimedia

Lars Klintwall Malmqvist (Larsklintwallmalmqvist) / Public domain

From NYC.gov:

How Can I Protect Myself and Others from Coronavirus?

•Wash hands often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available

.•Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve when sneezing or coughing. Do not use your hands.

•Do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.

•Do not shake hands. Instead wave or elbow bump.

•Monitor your heath more closely than usual for cold or flu symptoms.

•Get the flu shot. Although the flu shot will not protect you from COVID-19, it will help prevent the flu which has similar symptoms to this coronavirus.

To read more in English, click here.

 

关于COVID-19的须知信息

 

Lo que necesita saber sobre COVID-19

 

Что нужно знать о COVID-19

 

More languages here!

 

 

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Show Some Love to Chinatown!

From New City Council Member Margaret Chin:

Since the coronavirus made the news, we have been seeing a rise in xenophobia and discrimination against Asian New Yorkers and businesses. There’s never an excuse to discriminate, yet sadly during Lunar New Year, what should be the busiest time of the year, Chinatown shop and restaurant owners have been hit especially hard.

But we’re committed to turn crisis into opportunity.

Last weekend, crowds of New Yorkers celebrated a new year and new beginnings at the Lunar New Year parade. This week, I stood with Chinatown Partnership, Council Member Rivera, and small business owners to ask you to show some love to Chinatown. Watch the event here.

You can share your solidarity by visiting a local business to enter for a raffle sponsored by the Chinatown Partnership, taking a pic at the new Valentine’s Day themed backdrop at the Baxter Street kiosk, or using #DineinChinatown and tagging us.

Thank you to all the elected officials who have shown their support!

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6 & B Garden

On October 13th, Sunday, our W2 students volunteered at 6 & B Garden. After the volunteer work, they enjoyed coffee and mint water prepared by the garden. Thank you so much for hosting us, Barbara!

The students learned about the garden while walking around and listening to Barbara and Michael.

The students raked leaves, swept and picked up garbage on the streets around the garden, and cleaned the kids’ play area by digging the soil with shovels and moving the soil in a wheelbarrow to the pond. They also gathered leaves and sawed and cut tree branches and twigs to compost.

 

A bee was working hard, too.

Have you ever seen purple peppers? They were so exotic!

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M’Finda Kalunga Community Garden

A few days ago a few 3A and 3P students volunteered at M’Finda Kalunga Community Garden just around the block. They raked leaves, they shoveled dirt, they planted and watered plants, they fed fish and turtles, and they played bocce ball. Thanks to Park Warden Bob Humber (pictured in the back row left) for hosting us! To learn more about the M’Finda Kalunga Community Garden click here, and enjoy more pictures below:

 

 

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Culture Club!

This summer, the University Settlement Adult Literacy Program began a month-long Culture Club which met twice a week and not only studied English but also explored New York. One day was spent in the classroom learning relevant vocabulary and reading articles, and the second day was a field trip. Here’s a quick rundown up what we did:

√  Got an IDNYC

√  Studied NYC geography and learned how to use the subway system

√  Learned about Native Americans and the Lenape

√   Visited the National Museum of the American Indian

√   Learned art-related vocabulary and practiced describing paintings and sculptures in English

√   Visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art

√    Read about Chinese-American history

√    Visited the Museum of the Chinese in America

√   Studied vocabulary and read about gardening (This was in preparation for volunteering at the M’Finda Kalunga Community Garden but unfortunately we got rained out.)

√   Talked about and wrote about all of the places we visited and then typed up our writing on Microsoft Word

Here’s one student’s writing about one of our trips:

A Happy Day

Suman Li

Our teacher took us to visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art yesterday. The teacher said he would meet us on the front door steps at 10 A.M. so I got up early yesterday. I took the Manhattan-bound E train to 51st Street. Then I transferred to the uptown 6 train. I got off at 86th Street. When I arrived at the front steps, it was exactly 10 o’clock. We bought tickets and then went through security. First, we visited the Egyptian art. I visited the temple of Dendur. It is over two thousand years old. I was interested in the ancient Egyptian murals on the walls. I learned a lot of new things there. About half an hour later, the teacher led us to the roof garden. What a beautiful view! From that roof, I could overlook Central Park and the gorgeous New York City skyline. I also saw two sculptures on the roof. They were made from steel and stone and looked like 9 planes in the sky. Last, we returned to the second floor to visit exhibits from Europe and Asia. We left there at about 2 p.m. I was still very excited on the way home. It was really a happy day!

 

 

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Another Good Reason to Get a Library Card

As a New York Public Library card holder, you already know that your library card gives you access to a stunning variety of books, research materials, and so much more. And starting today, your library card gives you access to even more thanks to Culture Pass, a new service that allows you to visit dozens of cultural institutions around the city for free. Through Culture Pass, you can reserve free passes to dozens of museums and cultural institutions around the city.

Simply visit culturepass.nyc, select The New York Public Library, enter your library card barcode and pin, then choose from the variety of participating institutions and select when you’d like to visit. You can borrow passes for dates between two and three months in advance (depending on availability), and can have two pending reservations at any given time. After reserving a pass — for two or four people — you can print your pass at home or at your local library, or select the mobile option, and show the reservation confirmation on your phone.

Cultural institutions currently participating in Culture Pass include the following, but more will be added on an ongoing basis:

  • Brooklyn Botanic Garden
  • Brooklyn Children’s Museum
  • Brooklyn Historical Society
  • Brooklyn Museum
  • Children’s Museum of Manhattan
  • Children’s Museum of the Arts
  • Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
  • The Drawing Center
  • The Frick Collection
  • Historic Richmond Town
  • International Center of Photography
  • Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum
  • Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan Art
  • The Jewish Museum
  • Louis Armstrong House
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art
  • The Morgan Library & Museum
  • Museum of Modern Art, MoMA PS1
  • Museum of Chinese in America
  • Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust
  • Museum of the City of New York
  • New York Transit Museum
  • Noguchi Museum
  • Queens Historical Society
  • Queens Museum
  • Rubin Museum of Art
  • SculptureCenter
  • Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
  • Society of Illustrators
  • Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
  • Sugar Hill Children’s Museum
  • Wave Hill
  • Whitney Museum of American Art

Click here to learn more.

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