Manahatta to Manhattan

Here’s a great reading booklet from the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian about the first New Yorkers

The Lenape, Manhattan’s original inhabitants,  called the island Manahatta, which means “hilly island.”

Rich with natural resources, Manahatta had an abundance of fruits, nuts, birds, and animals. Fish and shellfish were plentiful and the ocean was full of seals, whales, and dolphins. Migrant birds flew to local marshes based on the available food supply or weather conditions.

The body of water off the coast of Lower Manhattan is an estuary, a place where saltwater from the Atlantic Ocean mixes with freshwater from the Hudson River. Estuaries are particularly good places for wildlife to live.

The Lenape called the Hudson River Shatemuc, meaning “the river that flows both ways,” because the river alternates its flow from north to south along with the Atlantic tides. Shatemuc was an important water route for the Lenape who traded with other Native people living in villages along its banks.

To read more, click here.

Idiom of the Week: Runs in the Family

Image result for luke and darth vader

https://www.starwars.com/news/anakin-and-luke-skywalker-twin-journeys

Meaning: A hereditary health problem; expressed as “Something runs in someone’s family.”

Examples:

Baldness runs in my family. If you look at our family reunion photos you see a lot of shiny heads!

You should tell your doctor if heart disease runs in your family.

Diabetes runs in her family but luckily she doesn’t have it.

Pop Quiz:

If something runs in someone’s family, it….

A.  Is genetic.

B.  Isn’t genetic.

C.  All of the above.

To see the correct answer, click on “Continue reading”:

Read More »

Much, Many, A Lot Of – Which One Do I Use?

By Flunse (Patrick Geltinger) – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=404343

Time for more grammar. This time we’re going to look at the words much, many, and a lot of.

The key to knowing when to use these words is remembering your count and non-count nouns. To review count and noun-count nouns, click here.

Basically, you use “many” with plural count nouns. For example: many people, many apples, many problems, many friends. You can use “many” in statements and questions, affirmative or negative.

“Much,” on the other hand, is used with non-count nouns. For example: much money, much homework, much coffee, much trouble. But we only use “much” in questions and negative statements. For example: “I don’t have much money. How much money do you have?” We do not say “I have much money.”

In this case, we say “I have a lot of money.” “A lot of” can be used with count or non-count nouns – it doesn’t matter! It can also be used in questions and statements, negative or affirmative. But if we begin the question with “how,” then we have to use either “much” or “many.” We can’t say “How a lot of money do you have?’

Watch this video for some extra practice, then take the quiz to test your knowledge:

 

Bringing It All Back Home – POSTPONED!

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED!

University Settlement has been fighting, with a coalition of our Lower East Side neighbors for the return to public use of the Stanton Street Building which is currently closed because the NYC Parks Department uses the building for storage.

The northern end of the Sara D. Roosevelt Park (where the building is located) needs some TLC, and we think opening the Stanton Building to public programming for our little ones, youth, and elders is a great place to start.

The Parks Department has finally agreed to look for an alternate storage facility. So we are celebrating with our NYC Councilmember Margaret Chin, and other elected officials, this Thursday with a press conference. Join us!

 

Hit the Road, Jack!

Here’s a song by Ray Charles using our latest Idiom of the Week – Enjoy!

Hit the Road, Jack
Ray Charles

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more, no more, no more, no more

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more

What’d you say?

 

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more, no more, no more, no more

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more

 

Oh woman, oh woman, don’t treat me so mean

You’re the meanest old woman that I’ve ever seen

I guess if you say so

I’ll have to pack my things and go (that’s right)

 

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more, no more, no more, no more

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more

What’d you say?

 

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more, no more, no more, no more

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more

Now baby, listen baby, don’t you treat me this way

‘Cause I’ll be back on my feet someday

Don’t care if you do, ’cause it’s understood

You ain’t got no money, you just ain’t no good

 

Well, I guess if you say so

I’ll have to pack my things and go (that’s right)

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more, no more, no more, no more

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more

What’d you say?

 

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more, no more, no more, no more

Hit the road Jack and don’t you come back

No more…