Your Story, Our Story

Your Story, Our Story features objects that tell personal stories of American immigration and migration.

This national project uncovers the patterns that bind us, no matter where we came from or how long we’ve been here. Explore stories from across the country, upload the story of an object that carries meaning in your family, and join us in telling the story of American immigration and migration.

In collaboration with the Tenement Museum, Class E4 (taught by Allyn Wong) share their stories online.

Click here or on the image above to read!

 

Idiom of the Week: Butterfingers

Meaning: A name for someone who drops something.

Examples:

When I dropped my coffee someone yelled, “Nice one, butterfingers!”

I’m such a butterfingers. I’ve already broken three of my new wine glasses.

He loves to play football, but he’s a butterfingers.

 

Pop Quiz:

In which profession is it dangerous to be a butterfingers?

A. Surgeon

B. Teacher

C. Butter Salesperson

To see the correct answer, click on “Continue reading”:

Read More »

Job, Jobs, Jobs!

Read one story from Class 2P about jobs, then take the quiz to test your understanding:

Ling Ling Zhao

My Past Job

I came to the United States in 2011. When I came here, I was looking for a job as a waitress because I was a waitress in China. I had four years’ experience. But when I went to an interview the supervisor didn’t employ me. He told me I couldn’t speak English well, so I couldn’t get the job. When I heard that, I was very disappointed.

One month later my friend called me and he told me some good news. He said his restaurant needed a cashier. No experience was required. The restaurant was in New Jersey. It was a Japanese restaurant and the name was Sarku Japan. It was a franchise company. I told him I didn’t know how to use a cash register and I couldn’t speak English well. He said, “It doesn’t matter. You can learn. The people who work there are very nice. Take it easy.”

The first day I went to work I was very nervous and made many mistakes, but they didn’t get angry. They encouraged me, saying, “Try your best. You can do it.” After that I worked very hard and I assisted customers very well. Some customers became my friends.

I liked this job because my co-workers were friendly and the customers were generous. They always gave me tips. I worked there for three years. I was not only a cashier but also a cook. The manager taught me how to make sushi and cut fish. I was happy that I could learn more job skills.

To read more job stories, click here.